Ozempic 1 mg solution for injection in pre-filled pen - Patient Information Leaflet (PIL) (2023)

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Active Ingredient:

semaglutide

Company:

Novo Nordisk LimitedSee contact details

ATC code:

A10BJ06

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Ozempic 1 mg solution for injection in pre-filled pen - Patient Information Leaflet (PIL) (20)

Last updated on emc:22 Sep 2022

Ozempic 1 mg solution for injection in pre-filled pen - Patient Information Leaflet (PIL) (21)This medicinal product is subject to additional monitoring. This will allow quick identification of new safety information.

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Below is a text only representation of the Patient Information Leaflet (ePIL).

The text only version may be available in large print, Braille or audio CD.For further information call emc accessibility on 0800 198 5000.The product code(s) for this leaflet is: PLGB 04668/0333.

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Ozempic 1 mg solution for injection in pre-filled pen

Package leaflet: Information for the patient

Ozempic 1 mg solution for injection in pre-filled pen

semaglutide

▼This medicine is subject to additional monitoring. This will allow quick identification of new safety information. You can help by reporting any side effects you may get. See the end of section 4 for how to report side effects.

Read all of this leaflet carefully before you start using this medicine because it contains important information for you.

  • Keep this leaflet. You may need to read it again.
  • If you have any further questions, ask your doctor, pharmacist or nurse.
  • This medicine has been prescribed for you only. Do not pass it on to others. It may harm them, even if their signs of illness are the same as yours.
  • If you get any side effects, talk to your doctor, pharmacist or nurse. This includes any possible side effects not listed in this leaflet. See section 4.

What is in this leaflet

1. What Ozempic is and what it is used for
2. What you need to know before you use Ozempic
3. How to use Ozempic
4. Possible side effects
5. How to store Ozempic
6. Contents of the pack and other information

1. What Ozempic is and what it is used for

Ozempic contains the active substance semaglutide. It helps your body reduce your blood sugar level only when blood sugar is too high and can help prevent heart disease.

Ozempic is used:

  • on its own – if your blood sugar is not controlled well enough by diet and exercise alone, and you cannot use metformin (another diabetes medicine) or
  • with other medicines for diabetes – when they are not enough to control your blood sugar levels. These other medicines may include: oral antidiabetics (such as metformin, thiazolidinediones, sulfonylureas, sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitor) or insulin.

It is important that you continue with your diet and exercise plan as told by your doctor, pharmacist or nurse.

2. What you need to know before you use Ozempic

Do not use Ozempic

  • if you are allergic to semaglutide or any of the other ingredients of this medicine (listed in section 6).

Warnings and precautions

Talk to your doctor, pharmacist or nurse before using this medicine.

This medicine is not an insulin and should not be used if:

  • you have type 1 diabetes – a condition where your body does not produce any insulin
  • you develop diabetic ketoacidosis – a complication of diabetes with high blood sugar, breathing difficulty, confusion, excessive thirst, a sweet smell to the breath or a sweet or metallic taste in the mouth.

Ozempic is not an insulin and should therefore not be used as a substitute for insulin.

Effects on the digestive system

During treatment with this medicine, you may feel sick (nausea) or be sick (vomiting), or have diarrhoea. These side effects can cause dehydration (loss of fluids). It is important that you drink plenty of fluids to prevent dehydration. This is especially important if you have kidney problems. Talk to your doctor if you have any questions or concerns.

Severe and on-going stomach pain which could be due to acute pancreatitis

If you have severe and on-going pain in the stomach area – see a doctor straight away as this could be a sign of acute pancreatitis (inflamed pancreas). Please see section 4 for the warning signs of inflamed pancreas.

(Video) Ozempic dosing clicks. || How to calculate Ozempic dose by clicks?

Hypoglycaemia

Combining a sulfonylurea or an insulin with this medicine might increase the risk of getting low blood sugar levels (hypoglycaemia). Please see section 4 for the warning signs of low blood sugar levels. Your doctor may ask you to test your blood sugar levels. This will help your doctor decide if the dose of the sulfonylurea or insulin needs to be changed to reduce the risk of low blood sugar.

Diabetic eye disease (retinopathy)

If you have diabetic eye disease and are using insulin, this medicine may lead to a worsening of your vision, and this may require treatment. Tell your doctor if you have diabetic eye disease or if you experience eye problems during treatment with this medicine.

Children and adolescents

This medicine is not recommended in children and adolescents under 18 years as the safety and efficacy in this age group have not yet been established.

Other medicines and Ozempic

Tell your doctor, pharmacist or nurse if you are taking, have recently taken or might take any other medicines, including herbal medicines or other medicines you bought without a prescription.

In particular, tell your doctor, pharmacist or nurse if you are using medicines containing any of the following:

  • Warfarin or other similar medicines taken by mouth to reduce blood clotting (oral anti-coagulants). Frequent blood testing to determine the ability of your blood to clot may be required.
  • If you are using insulin, your doctor will tell you how to reduce the dose of insulin and will recommend you to monitor your blood sugar more frequently, in order to avoid hyperglycaemia (high blood sugar) and diabetic ketoacidosis (a complication of diabetes that occurs when the body is unable to break down glucose because there is not enough insulin).

Pregnancy and breast-feeding

If you are pregnant or breast-feeding, think you might be pregnant, or are planning to have a baby, ask your doctor for advice before taking this medicine.

This medicine should not be used during pregnancy, as it is not known if it may affect your unborn child. Therefore, it is recommended to use contraception while using this medicine. If you wish to become pregnant, you should stop using this medicine at least two months in advance. If you become pregnant when using this medicine, talk to your doctor right away, as your treatment will need to be changed.

Do not use this medicine if you are breast-feeding, as it is unknown if it passes into breast milk.

Driving and using machines

Ozempic is unlikely to affect your ability to drive and use machines. If you use this medicine in combination with a sulphonylurea or insulin, low blood sugar (hypoglycaemia) may occur which may reduce your ability to concentrate. Avoid driving or using machines if you get any signs of low blood sugar. See section 2, ‘Warning and precautions’ for information on increased risk of low blood sugar and section 4 for the warning signs of low blood sugar. Talk to your doctor for further information.

Sodium content

This medicine contains less than 1 mmol sodium (23 mg) per dose, that is to say essentially ‘sodium-free’.

3. How to use Ozempic

Always use this medicine exactly as your doctor has told you. Check with your doctor, pharmacist or nurse if you are not sure.

How much to use

  • The starting dose is 0.25 mg once a week for four weeks.
  • After four weeks your doctor will increase your dose to 0.5 mg once a week.
  • Your doctor may increase your dose to 1 mg once a week if your blood sugar is not controlled well enough with a dose of 0.5 mg once a week.
  • Your doctor may increase your dose to 2 mg once a week if your blood sugar is not controlled well enough with a dose of 1 mg once a week.

Do not change your dose unless your doctor has told you to.

How Ozempic is given

Ozempic is given as an injection under the skin (subcutaneous injection). Do not inject it into a vein or muscle.

  • The best places to give the injection are the front of your thighs, the front of your waist (abdomen), or your upper arm.
  • Before you use the pen for the first time, your doctor or nurse will show you how to use it.

Detailed instructions for use are on the other side of this leaflet.

When to use Ozempic

  • You should use this medicine once a week on the same day each week if possible.
  • You can give yourself the injection at any time of the day – regardless of meals.

To help you remember to inject this medicine once a week only, it is recommended to note the chosen weekday (e.g. Wednesday) on the carton and to write the date on the carton every time you have injected it.

If necessary you can change the day of your weekly injection of this medicine as long as it has been at least 3 days since your last injection of it. After selecting a new dosing day, continue with once a week dosing.

If you use more Ozempic than you should

If you use more Ozempic than you should, talk to your doctor straight away. You may get side effects such as feeling sick (nausea).

If you forget to use Ozempic

If you forgot to inject a dose and:

  • it is 5 days or less since you should have used Ozempic, use it as soon as you remember. Then inject your next dose as usual on your scheduled day.
  • it is more than 5 days since you should have used Ozempic, skip the missed dose. Then inject your next dose as usual on your scheduled day.

Do not use a double dose to make up for a forgotten dose.

If you stop using Ozempic

Do not stop using this medicine without talking to your doctor. If you stop using it, your blood sugar levels may increase.

If you have any further questions on the use of this medicine, ask your doctor, pharmacist or nurse.

4. Possible side effects

Like all medicines, this medicine can cause side effects, although not everybody gets them.

Serious side effects

Common (may affect up to 1 in 10 people)

  • complications of diabetic eye disease (retinopathy) – you should inform your doctor if you experience eye problems, such as changes in vision, during treatment with this medicine.

Uncommon (may affect up to 1 in 100 people)

  • Inflamed pancreas (acute pancreatitis) which could cause severe pain in the stomach and back which does not go away. You should see a doctor immediately if you experience such symptoms.

Rare (may affect up to 1 in 1 000 people)

  • severe allergic reactions (anaphylactic reactions, angioedema). You should seek immediate medical help and inform your doctor straight away if you get symptoms such as breathing problems, swelling of face, lips, tongue and/or throat with difficulty swallowing and a fast heartbeat.

Other side effects

Very common (may affect more than 1 in 10 people)

  • feeling sick (nausea) – this usually goes away over time
  • diarrhoea – this usually goes away over time

Common (may affect up to 1 in 10 people)

  • being sick (vomiting)
  • low blood sugar (hypoglycaemia) when this medicine is used with another antidiabetic medicine

The warning signs of low blood sugar may come on suddenly. They can include: cold sweat, cool pale skin, headache, fast heartbeat, feeling sick (nausea) or very hungry, changes in vision, feeling sleepy or weak, feeling nervous, anxious or confused, difficulty concentrating or shaking.

Your doctor will tell you how to treat low blood sugar and what to do if you notice these warning signs.

Low blood sugar is more likely to happen if you also take a sulfonylurea or insulin. Your doctor may reduce your dose of these medicines before you start using this medicine.

  • indigestion
  • inflamed stomach (‘gastritis’) – the signs include stomach ache, feeling sick (nausea) or being sick (vomiting)
  • reflux or heartburn – also called ‘gastro-esophageal reflux disease’ (GERD)
  • stomach pain
  • bloating of the stomach
  • constipation
  • burping
  • gall stones
  • dizziness
  • tiredness
  • weight loss
  • less appetite
  • gas (flatulence)
  • increase of pancreatic enzymes (such as lipase and amylase).

Uncommon (may affect up to 1 in 100 people)

  • change in the way food or drink tastes
  • fast pulse
  • injection site reactions – such as bruising, pain, irritation, itching and rash.
  • allergic reactions like rash, itching or hives.

Reporting of side effects

If you get any side effects, talk to your doctor, pharmacist or nurse. This includes any possible side effects not listed in this leaflet. You can also report side effects directly via

(Video) Ozempic 1mg pen clicks. || How to dose Ozempic pen into 0.25 mg & 0.5 mg.

Great Britain:

Yellow Card Scheme

Website: www.mhra.gov.uk/yellowcard

or search for MHRA Yellow Card in the Google Play or Apple App Store

By reporting side effects you can help provide more information on the safety of this medicine.

5. How to store Ozempic

Keep this medicine out of the sight and reach of children.

Do not use this medicine after the expiry date which is stated on the pen label and carton after ’EXP’. The expiry date refers to the last day of that month.

Before opening:

Store in a refrigerator (2 °C–8 °C). Do not freeze. Keep away from the cooling element. Protect from light.

During use:

  • You can keep the pen for 6 weeks when stored at a temperature below 30°C or in a refrigerator (2 °C–8 °C) away from the cooling element. Do not freeze Ozempic and do not use it if it has been frozen.
  • When you are not using the pen, keep the pen cap on in order to protect from light.

Do not use this medicine if you notice that the solution is not clear and colourless or almost colourless.

Do not throw away any medicines via wastewater or household waste. Ask your pharmacist how to throw away medicines you no longer use. These measures will help protect the environment.

6. Contents of the pack and other information

What Ozempic contains

  • The active substance is semaglutide. One ml solution for injection contains 1.34 mg semaglutide. One pre-filled pen contains 4 mg semaglutide in 3 ml solution. Each dose contains 1 mg of semaglutide in 0.74 ml.
  • The other ingredients are: disodium phosphate dihydrate, propylene glycol, phenol, water for injections, sodium hydroxide/hydrochloric acid (for pH adjustment). See also section 2, ‘Sodium content’.

What Ozempic looks like and contents of the pack

Ozempic is a clear and colourless or almost colourless solution for injection in a pre-filled pen. Each pre-filled pen contains 3 ml solution, delivering 4 doses of 1 mg.

Ozempic 1 mg solution for injection is available in the following pack sizes:

1 pen and 4 disposable NovoFine Plus needles.

3 pens and 12 disposable NovoFine Plus needles.

Not all pack sizes may be marketed.

Marketing Authorisation Holder

Novo Nordisk A/S
Novo Allé
DK-2880 Bagsværd
Denmark

Manufacturer

The manufacturer can be identified by the batch number printed on the slip of the carton and on the label:

  • If the second and third characters are P5, ZF or FG, the manufacturer is

Novo Nordisk A/S
Novo Allé
DK-2880 Bagsværd
Denmark

  • If the second and third characters are T6, the manufacturer is

Novo Nordisk Production SAS
45 Avenue d’Orléans
28000 Chartres
France

This leaflet was last revised in 07/2022.

Instructions on how to use Ozempic 1 mg solution for injection in pre-filled pen

Please read these instructions carefully before using your Ozempic pre-filled pen.

Do not use the pen without proper training from your doctor or nurse.

Start by checking your pen to make sure that it contains Ozempic 1 mg, then look at the illustrations below to get to know the different parts of your pen and needle.

If you are blind or have poor eyesight and cannot read the dose counter on the pen, do not use this pen without help. Get help from a person with good eyesight who is trained to use the Ozempic pre-filled pen.

Your pen is a pre-filled dial-a-dose pen. It contains 4 mg of semaglutide, and you can only select doses of 1 mg. Your pen is designed to be used with NovoFine and NovoTwist disposable needles up to a length of 8 mm.

NovoFine Plus needles are included in the pack.

1. Prepare your pen with a new needle

  • Check the name and coloured label of your pen, to make sure that it contains Ozempic. This is especially important if you take more than one type of injectable medicine. Using the wrong medicine could cause severe harm to your health.
  • Pull off the pen cap.
  • Check that the solution in your pen is clear and colourless. Look through the pen window. If the solution looks cloudy or coloured, do not use the pen.
  • Take a new needle.
    Check the paper tab and the outer needle cap for damages that could affect sterility. If any damage is seen use a new needle.
  • Tear off the paper tab.
  • Push the needle straight onto the pen. Turn until it is on tight.
  • Pull off the outer needle cap and keep it for later. You will need it after the injection, to safely remove the needle from the pen.
  • Pull off the inner needle cap and throw it away. If you try to put it back on, you may accidentally stick yourself with the needle.

A drop of solution may appear at the needle tip. This is normal, but you must still check the flow, if you use a new pen for the first time. See step 2 ‘Check the flow’.

Do not attach a new needle to your pen until you are ready to take your injection.

Always use a new needle for each injection.

This reduces the risk of blocked needles, contamination, infection and inaccurate dosing.

Never use a bent or damaged needle.

2. Check the flow

  • Before your first injection with each new pen, check the flow. If your pen is already in use, go to step 3 ‘Select your dose’.
  • Turn the dose selector until the dose counter shows the flow check symbol.
  • Hold the pen with the needle pointing up.
    Press and hold in the dose button until the dose counter returns to 0. The 0 must line up with the dose pointer.
    A drop of solution should appear at the needle tip.

A small drop may remain at the needle tip, but it will not be injected.

If no drop appears, repeat step 2 ‘Check the flow’ up to 6 times. If there is still no drop, change the needle and repeat step 2 ‘Check the flow’ once more.

If a drop still does not appear, dispose of the pen and use a new one.

Always make sure that a drop appears at the needle tip before you use a new pen for the first time. This makes sure that the solution flows.

If no drop appears, you will not inject any medicine even though the dose counter may move. This may indicate a blocked or damaged needle.

If you do not check the flow before your first injection with each new pen, you may not get the prescribed dose and the intended effect of Ozempic.

3. Select your dose

(Video) LDP : How to use the Ozempic pre filled pen for injection

  • Turn the dose selector to select 1 mg.
    Keep turning until the dose counter stops and shows 1 mg.

Only the dose counter and dose pointer will show that 1 mg has been selected.

The dose selector clicks differently when turned forwards, backwards or past 1 mg. Do not count the pen clicks.

Always use the dose counter and the dose pointer to see that 1 mg has been selected before injecting this medicine.

Do not count the pen clicks.

1 mg in the dose counter must line up precisely with the dose pointer to ensure that you get a correct dose.

How much solution is left

  • To see how much solution is left, use the dose counter: Turn the dose selector until the dose counter stops.
    If it shows 1, at least 1 mg is left in your pen.
    If the dose counter stops before 1 mg, there is not enough solution left for a full dose of 1 mg.

If there is not enough solution left in your pen for a full dose, do not use it. Use a new Ozempic pen.

4. Inject your dose

  • Insert the needle into your skin as your doctor or nurse has shown you.
  • Make sure you can see the dose counter. Do not cover it with your fingers. This could interrupt the injection.
  • Press and hold down the dose button until the dose counter shows 0. The 0 must line up with the dose pointer. You may then hear or feel a click.
  • Keep the needle in your skin after the dose counter has returned to 0 and count slowly to 6. This is to make sure that you get your full dose.
  • If the needle is removed earlier, you may see a stream of solution coming from the needle tip. If so, the full dose will not be delivered.
  • Remove the needle from your skin. If blood appears at the injection site, press lightly. Do not rub the area.

You may see a drop of solution at the needle tip after injecting. This is normal and does not affect your dose.

Always watch the dose counter to know how many mg you inject. Hold the dose button down until the dose counter shows 0.

How to identify a blocked or damaged needle

  • If 0 does not appear in the dose counter after continuously pressing the dose button, you may have used a blocked or damaged needle.
  • In this case, you have not received any medicine – even though the dose counter has moved from the original dose that you have set.

How to handle a blocked needle

Change the needle as described in step 5 ‘After your injection’ and repeat all steps starting with step 1 ‘Prepare your pen with a new needle’. Make sure you select the full dose you need.

Never touch the dose counter when you inject. This can interrupt the injection.

5. After your injection

  • Lead the needle tip into the outer needle cap on a flat surface without touching the needle or the outer needle cap.
  • Once the needle is covered, carefully push the outer needle cap completely on.
  • Unscrew the needle and dispose of it carefully in accordance with local guidelines. Ask your doctor, nurse or pharmacist about sharps disposal.
  • Put the pen cap on your pen after each use to protect the solution from light.

Always dispose of the needle after each injection to ensure convenient injections and prevent blocked needles. If the needle is blocked, you will not inject any medicine.

When the pen is empty, throw it away without a needle on as instructed by your doctor, nurse, pharmacist or local authorities.

Never try to put the inner needle cap back on the needle. You may stick yourself with the needle.

Always remove the needle from your pen immediately after each injection.

This reduces the risk of blocked needles, contamination, infection, leakage of solution and inaccurate dosing.

Further important information

  • Always keep your pen and needles out of the sight and reach of others, especially children.
  • Never share your pen or your needles with other people.
  • Caregivers must be very careful when handling used needles to prevent needle injury and cross-infection.

Caring for your pen

Treat your pen with care. Rough handling or misuse may cause inaccurate dosing. If this happens you might not get the intended effect of this medicine.

  • Do not inject Ozempic which has been frozen. If you do that, you might not get the intended effect of this medicine.
  • Do not inject Ozempic which has been exposed to direct sunlight. If you do that, you might not get the intended effect of this medicine.
  • Do not expose your pen to dust, dirt or liquid.
  • Do not wash, soak or lubricate your pen. If necessary, clean it with a mild detergent on a moistened cloth.
  • Do not drop your pen or knock it against hard surfaces. If you drop it or suspect a problem, attach a new needle and check the flow before you inject.
  • Do not try to refill your pen. Once empty, it must be disposed of.
  • Do not try to repair your pen or pull it apart.

Novo Nordisk Limited

Ozempic 1 mg solution for injection in pre-filled pen - Patient Information Leaflet (PIL) (26)

Address

3 City Place, Beehive Ring Road, Gatwick, West Sussex, RH6 0PA

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+44 (0)1293 613555

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+44 (0)1293 613535

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+44 (0)800 023 2573

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[emailprotected]

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+44 (0)800 023 2573

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(Video) How Many clicks in Ozempic 2 mg Pen

FAQs

What is Ozempic 1 mg pen used for? ›

Ozempic® (semaglutide) injection 0.5 mg, 1 mg, or 2 mg is an injectable prescription medicine used: along with diet and exercise to improve blood sugar in adults with type 2 diabetes.

Is Ozempic 1 mg pen being discontinued? ›

Ozempic® (semaglutide) injection - Ozempic® 0.25 mg or 0.5 mg dose, 2 mg/1.5 mL (subcutaneous solution, 1 pen) will no longer be available starting in March 2023.

What is Ozempic solution for injection 1mg? ›

OZEMPIC is indicated for the treatment of adults with insufficiently controlled type 2 diabetes mellitus as an adjunct to diet and exercise: as monotherapy when metformin is not tolerated or contraindicated.

How much weight can you lose in a month with Ozempic? ›

About a third of people who take Ozempic for weight loss will lose 10% or more of their body weight. Most people should expect to lose at least 5% of their starting body weight when using Ozempic for weight loss.

Will Ozempic reduce belly fat? ›

Will Ozempic or Wegovy reduce belly fat? The answer appears to be yes. That Novo Nordisk-funded study of almost 2,000 overweight or obese adults without diabetes also found their visceral fat — the type that accumulates in the belly — was reduced from baseline with semaglutide, along with their total fat mass.

How much weight can you lose on Ozempic? ›

In general, more weight loss and better blood glucose control are seen with higher Ozempic doses. During a 40-week study, people receiving the 1 mg Ozempic dose lost an average of 13 lbs. And people receiving the 2 mg Ozempic dose lost an average of 15 lbs.

How much does one pen of Ozempic cost? ›

The cost of one monthly dose of Ozempic pen is around $892.06 (NovoCare-a, 2022). There are no generic forms of Ozempic available.

How much is a monthly supply of Ozempic? ›

How much is a monthly supply of Ozempic? The average monthly cost of Ozempic is $209. What is the cost of Ozempic without insurance? Ozempic can be expensive without insurance.

Why is Ozempic not covered by insurance? ›

They aren't FDA-approved for weight loss, so they often aren't covered for that use. Ozempic and similar drugs mimic a naturally occurring gut hormone called glucagon-like peptide 1, or GLP-1, which binds to and activates receptors in various parts of the body that can have beneficial effects for diabetes and obesity.

How many clicks in a 1 mg Ozempic pen? ›

If you count the clicks (notches on the pen) as you turn the dosing dial you will notice that there are approximately 78 clicks for 1.0 mg.

Is Ozempic better than metformin? ›

Does Ozempic work better than metformin? Because Ozempic and metformin work in different ways, neither necessarily works better than the other. Depending on the dose, either metformin or Ozempic may lower blood sugar levels more than the other drug.

How long does it take for Ozempic to suppress appetite? ›

With Calibrate, members can expect to start seeing results after a couple of weeks of tapering up on the medication. You'll likely notice some changes in appetite and reductions in food cravings within the first week.

Can you drink coffee on Ozempic? ›

Make sure you are consuming plenty of fluids throughout the day when taking this medication and limit caffeine consumption to no more than one cup of coffee per day. Caffeinated beverages such as tea and soda should also be limited when taking Ozempic, as they may harm your blood sugar levels.

Do you gain weight back after stopping Ozempic? ›

Some individuals may actually gain more weight after stopping an obesity drug than they initially lost, Conde-Knape added. Studies have similarly shown weight rebound in people who stop taking Ozempic.

Is hair loss a side effect of Ozempic? ›

Hair loss is not listed as a side effect of Ozempic, but in clinical trials for Wegovy, 3% of people reported hair loss, compared to 1% of people who got a placebo. (While Ozempic and Wegovy are the same drug, Wegovy is given at a higher dose.)

Can I take Ozempic for weight loss if I'm not diabetic? ›

Ideally, you should not take Ozempic if you do not have diabetes, or if you're pregnant, breastfeeding, or planning on becoming pregnant. Ozempic may cause serious (but rare) side effects, including thyroid C-cell tumors and medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC).

What does Ozempic do to your face? ›

What to know about “Ozempic face” “Ozempic face” is a term for common side effects of the type 2 diabetes medication semaglutide (Ozempic). It can cause sagging and aging of facial skin. A doctor may recommend lifestyle modifications or facial fillers to treat these effects.

How long does it take Ozempic to start working? ›

Seeing results. Ozempic starts working within the first week of beginning your maintenance dose. Your blood sugar levels will start to decline during this time. Reaching the steady state can take about four to five weeks of once-a-week Ozempic doses.

How long should you stay on Ozempic? ›

A person can stay on Ozempic® so long as they are tolerating the medication and it is deemed appropriate by their treating provider. There is no specific time frame when someone should stop taking Ozempic as it is a medication that is intended for chronic (long-term) use.

Does Ozempic start working right away? ›

How long does Ozempic take to work? Ozempic starts to work shortly after it's been injected. After you start using Ozempic, your body may take several weeks to get used to it and to get the full benefit. Depending on how you're doing with Ozempic, your doctor may then adjust your dose.

How many pens is a 30 day supply of Ozempic? ›

This carton containing 2 pens can last you a whole month. You would only need this pen if your doctor has prescribed you the higher dose of 1 mg per week of Ozempic injection. Your Ozempic pen should be stored in the refrigerator (between 36°F to 46°F or 2°C to 8°C) until the first time you use it.

How do I get Ozempic for $25 a month for weight loss? ›

If you have private or commercial insurance, such as insurance you receive through an employer, you may be eligible to pay as little as $25 for a 1-, 2-, or 3-month prescription (maximum savings of $150 per 1-month prescription, $300 per 2-month prescription, or $450 per 3-month prescription).

What is a cheaper alternative to Ozempic? ›

Is there a cheaper substitute for Ozempic? Victoza (liraglutide) is another GLP-1 agonist that is similar to Ozempic but is less expensive. Other diabetes medications are also much less expensive, such as metformin, glipizide, or insulin.

Is it better to take Ozempic at night or morning? ›

It doesn't make a big difference whether you take it in the morning or at night. It's possible to change the day of the week you inject Ozempic. The general rule is to avoid injecting it with less than 2 days in between shots. But it's best to talk with your healthcare provider or pharmacist first.

Can I eat eggs while on Ozempic? ›

For those on the drug, Rubin recommends increasing your intake of lean protein such as chicken, turkey, fish, eggs, beans, soy and low-fat dairy.

Should you drink lots of water when taking Ozempic? ›

During treatment with this medicine, you may feel sick (nausea) or be sick (vomiting), or have diarrhoea. These side effects can cause dehydration (loss of fluids). It is important that you drink plenty of fluids to prevent dehydration.

Does Ozempic need to be refrigerated? ›

How should Ozempic® be stored? Prior to first use (until expiration date): Ozempic® should be refrigerated at 36°F to 46°F (2°C to 8°C). After first use (up to 56 days): Ozempic® should be stored at room temperature 59°F to 86°F (15°C to 30°C) or refrigerated at 36°F to 46°F (2°C to 8°C).

Do celebrities take Ozempic? ›

Demand has skyrocketed for the diabetes and obesity treatment Ozempic, as many social media influencers and celebrities are suspected of using the drug as a quick fix for weight loss.

Will my insurance pay for Ozempic for weight loss? ›

So far, drugs like Wegovy and Ozempic are usually excluded from people's insurance coverage. Medicare and Medicaid generally do not include weight-loss drugs.

Will Medicare pay for Ozempic? ›

Medicare doesn't cover Ozempic (or Wegovy) for weight loss

That means unless you have another source of coverage, you'd need to pay out of pocket for a semaglutide prescription for weight loss, whether it's branded Ozempic or Wegovy.

Is Ozempic an expensive medication? ›

"And the costs can be anywhere between $1,000 to $1,500 a month." Both Ozempic and Mounjaro are approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat Type 2 diabetes, but some doctors prescribe them "off-label" for weight loss.

Is Ozempic an insulin? ›

Ozempic is not insulin. It helps your pancreas produce more insulin when your blood sugar is high.

What can I use instead of Ozempic 1 mg pen? ›

Trulicity works the same way as Ozempic and Victoza. Trulicity is indicated to improve blood sugar control in adults with Type 2 diabetes. It can also be used to reduce the risk of major heart events in adults with both T2D and heart disease or multiple risk factors.

Is Ozempic safe? ›

Ozempic is generally considered safe in doses up to 2 mg. for adults with type 2 diabetes, but experts share that some people should not take it.

What is stronger than Ozempic for weight loss? ›

Ozempic for weight loss: which is better? In a clinical trial that compared weekly use of semaglutide 1 mg and 2.4 mg, semaglutide 2.4 mg (the maximum dose of Wegovy) caused more significant weight loss than semaglutide 1 mg (the typical maintenance dose of Ozempic) (Davies, 2021; Singh, 2022).

What is the best medicine to lower A1C? ›

DPP-4 inhibitors help improve A1C (a measure of average blood glucose levels over two to three months) without causing hypoglycemia low blood glucose). They work by preventing the breakdown of naturally occurring hormones in the body, GLP-1 and GIP.

Does Ozempic make you tired? ›

The short answer is that, yes, Ozempic can make you feel tired, but it's a rare side effect of the drug. Ozempic and its active ingredient, semaglutide, have been extensively studied for safety and efficacy for blood sugar control and weight loss.

How will I feel after starting Ozempic? ›

Semaglutide (Ozempic, Wegovy, Rybelsus) can cause side effects that some people are unable to tolerate. Following dosing guidelines can help manage these side effects. Nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea are the most common semaglutide side effects. But they usually subside after a few weeks of using the medication.

What happens in the first week of Ozempic? ›

Key Points. Your blood glucose (sugar) levels should start to fully decline within the first week after you start using Ozempic (semaglutide) at your regular maintenance dose. However, the full effect can take 8 weeks or longer, as this is a long-acting medication that is injected only once per week.

How will I feel after taking Ozempic? ›

Ozempic has other common side effects, including nausea, constipation, vomiting, heartburn, gas, headache, and dizziness. Not everyone experiences side effects, and they may be mild for others.

Can you eat cheese while taking Ozempic? ›

Lean protein sources from eggs, low-fat cheese, Greek yogurt, chicken, turkey, fish, nuts, tofu, and beans are all excellent ways to bulk up on protein while eating healthy if you take Ozempic.

Why do I feel better on Ozempic? ›

It mimics a hormone that makes you feel full longer, reduces food cravings and suppresses your appetite. The medication also slows down stomach emptying, so patients are satisfied with smaller portions and feel less hungry overall.

Can you stay on Ozempic for life? ›

Experts said they consider Ozempic and Wegovy to be lifelong medications.

What is the most common side effect of Ozempic? ›

Nausea was the most common side effect reported by people taking the drug in clinical trials. For most people, the nausea was mild and temporary. You're more likely to have nausea when you first start Ozempic treatment or after your doctor increases your dose.

How do you use Ozempic 1 mg pen for weight loss? ›

Ozempic is to be injected subcutaneously in the abdomen, in the thigh or in the upper arm. The injection site can be changed without dose adjustment. Ozempic should not be administered intravenously or intramuscularly. Ozempic is to be administered once weekly at any time of the day, with or without meals.

Can a non diabetic take Ozempic for weight loss? ›

Can you take Ozempic for weight loss only? Yes, and people do. However, there are also FDA-approved weight loss medications for people who do not have diabetes, such as Wegovy. If you do not have diabetes but are interested in a weight loss medication, talk with your doctor who can offer you alternatives.

Is Ozempic used for anything other than diabetes? ›

The Food and Drug Administration approved Ozempic for people with type 2 diabetes in 2017, then Wegovy — the same drug, which goes up to higher dosage — in 2021 for weight loss in adults with obesity or those who are overweight and have least one weight-related health condition, such as high blood pressure or ...

How many weeks does a 1mg Ozempic pen last? ›

If you use the 0.5 mg, 1 mg or 2 mg maintenance dose per week, your pen will hold 4 doses and last for one month.

What is the best time of day to inject Ozempic for weight loss? ›

What is the best time to take Ozempic®? Administer Ozempic® once weekly on the same day each week, at any time of the day, with or without meals.

What is the best time of day to take Ozempic? ›

When should I take Ozempic? You should inject Ozempic once a week — on the same day of the week, every week. It doesn't make a big difference whether you take it in the morning or at night. It's possible to change the day of the week you inject Ozempic.

How do I maximize my weight loss on Ozempic? ›

Ozempic to ramp up production driven by off-label demand

"There's nothing better than you not only losing weight, but also overall eating much healthier food." For those on the drug, Rubin recommends increasing your intake of lean protein such as chicken, turkey, fish, eggs, beans, soy and low-fat dairy.

How long does it take for Ozempic to work? ›

Ozempic starts working within the first week of beginning your maintenance dose. Your blood sugar levels will start to decline during this time. Reaching the steady state can take about four to five weeks of once-a-week Ozempic doses.

What is the biggest side effect of Ozempic? ›

Semaglutide (Ozempic, Wegovy, Rybelsus) can cause side effects that some people are unable to tolerate. Following dosing guidelines can help manage these side effects. Nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea are the most common semaglutide side effects.

What is the best medicine to lower A1c? ›

DPP-4 inhibitors help improve A1C (a measure of average blood glucose levels over two to three months) without causing hypoglycemia low blood glucose). They work by preventing the breakdown of naturally occurring hormones in the body, GLP-1 and GIP.

Videos

1. What is the Dose of Ozempic Injection
(Pharmacist Online)
2. Ozempic injection: how to use | The Hangry Woman
(The Hangry Woman)
3. This is what happens when you stop taking Ozempic
(Good Morning America)
4. I had to SPLIT my Ozempic dosing (not by choice) but then THIS happened! After months of frustration
(Ana McKenna)
5. How to use Ozempic (Semaglutide) pen for Diabetes? Dr. Nikhil Gupta MD
(My Practical Diet)
6. How to use your OZEMPIC pen
(DRK Channel)

References

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